History

Monday, July 4, 2016 (All day)

Celebrate America’s Independence at the home of founding father and 2nd President of the United States, John Adams.

2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Independence Forever: Re-enactment of the Continental Congress. Become a delegate to the Second Continental Congress and reenact the passage of the Declaration of Independence. Join the "band of brothers" who changed the course of history in 1776 and sign the historic document.

135 Adams Street
Quincy, MA 02169
Phone: 617-773-1177
Free Event
Wednesday, July 4, 2018 (All day)

Celebrate America’s Independence at the home of founding father and 2nd President of the United States, John Adams.

2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Independence Forever: Re-enactment of the Continental Congress. Become a delegate to the Second Continental Congress and reenact the passage of the Declaration of Independence. Join the "band of brothers" who changed the course of history in 1776 and sign the historic document.

135 Adams Street
Quincy, MA 02169
Phone: 617-773-1177
Free Event
Tuesday, July 4, 2017 (All day)

Celebrate America’s Independence at the home of founding father and 2nd President of the United States, John Adams.

2:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m. Independence Forever: Re-enactment of the Continental Congress. Become a delegate to the Second Continental Congress and reenact the passage of the Declaration of Independence. Join the "band of brothers" who changed the course of history in 1776 and sign the historic document.

135 Adams Street
Quincy, MA 02169
Phone: 617-773-1177
Free Event
Monday, July 11, 2016 - 12:00pm

Each year on their birthday anniversaries the President of the United States sends a wreath to the church to be placed on the tombs of the Presidents. The tradition started during the administration of President Lyndon Johnson whereby a wreath of red, white and blue flowers are sent to the burial place of all deceased presidents on the anniversary of their birthday. The ceremonies are open to the public and attended by local, state and government officials.

1306 Hancock Street
Quincy, MA 02169
Phone: 617-773-0062
Free Event
Thursday, June 23, 2016 - 6:00pm

Enjoy exhibition game featuring historic uniforms, period game rules, food vendors with Ball Park Treatsfor sale such as sausages and ice cream. Opening ceremony at 6:00 p.m., first pitch 6:30 p.m.

French's Common, 1 John F. Kennedy Memorial Drive
Braintree, MA 02184
Free Event
Sunday, June 19, 2016 (All day)

In his autobiography, John Adams reflected on the influence of his father: "You may have heard of John Adams and John Quincy Adams referenced as "Fathers of our Country." But what was it like growing up with them? On Father's Day, the tour of Adams National Historical Park focuses on a side of John and John Quincy Adams we rarely get to see – as fathers and family men.

Visitor Center
1250 Hancock Street
Quincy, MA 02169
Phone: 617-773-1177
Price: 
Free admission for fathers
Free Event
Saturday, June 18, 2016 -
10:00am to 12:00pm

On this walking tour, learn about the history and architecture of Quincy’s Wollaston neighborhood and get tips on adding curb appeal to your old house through historic paint color combinations and enhanced architectural features. The Wollaston neighborhood surrounding Historic New England’s Quincy House was developed between 1895 and 1930 and includes many examples of Victorian and Colonial Revival-style homes. Historic preservation expert Sally Zimmerman leads the tour and explains how to help recapture your home's historic character.

Josiah Quincy House, a Historic New England Property
20 Muirhead Street
Quincy, MA 02170
Phone: 617-994-5930
Price: 
$5 Historic New England members and Quincy residents, $10 nonmembers. Registration is required. Please call 617-994-5930 or purchase tickets online at HistoricNewEngland.org

Quincy Historical Society will mark the 150th anniversary of the Gettysburg Address with a talk by Society executive director Edward Fitzgerald on Thursday, November 21, at 7:30 PM at the Adams Academy in Quincy Center.  Dr. Fitzgerald will look at the speech in the context of Quincy’s contemporary experience of the war in 1863 and will explore the possible connections between the ideas and language of the Address and the ideas, language, and work of John Quincy Adams.

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